Deepwater Horizon – Biggest oil spills

Deepwater Horizon - Fire on the drilling rigDeepwater Horizon - Dark smoke and fire on drilling rig (6 May 2010) Deepwater Horizon - Coast cleanupDeepwater Horizon - Oil spillGulf of Mexico - 28-04-2010Aerial view reconnaissance of Louisiana coastline, USAU.S. Coast-Guard, BP, other federal agencies working after explosion in Gulf of Mexico

Deepwater Horizon – Biggest oil spills

  • Place: Gulf of Mexico
  • Date: 22 april 2010
  • Amount of spill: 779 100 000 liters
  • Costs: $ 5 billion

Deepwater Horizon – It was a floating oil rig. Built in 2001. In 2009, it bore the largest well in history – 10 km. A year later, this record was overshadowed by a tragic explosion. Which created biggest oil spill in history. This tragedy happened at a depth of 1500 m. Two days after the explosion the platform sank. A few months later, technicians managed to introduce a special sealing compound into the damaged well. Which blocked the crack.

The explosion kills

The accident occurred due to highly compressed methane. Which tore the top cover of the drilling rig and exploded after contact with air. It killed 11 people on the spot and then disrupted the platform statistics. Within days, the stain reached the shores of Louisiana. Ravaging nature on the way. The coast of five US states was affected by this. Including the rare Mississippi wetlands. As a result of this disaster, died 6,000 sea turtles, 26 thousand dolphins and whales, 82 thousand birds and huge numbers of fish and invertebrates.

Bacteria under ocean bottom

Bacteria under ocean bottom - Atlantic Ocean surface

Bacteria under ocean bottom

Bacteria under ocean bottom – American geologists from Oregon, performed in Atlantic oceanic crust (where the temperature is approx. 102 ° C) drilling to a depth of 1,391 m. Among granitic igneous rocks found relatively rich bacterial ecosystem. Bacteria feed on methane and benzene there.

Biogas plants aren’t tight

Biogas plants aren't tight - Biogas plant sketch

Biogas plants aren’t tight

Biogas plants aren’t tight – In Poland there are over 200 biogas plants. Which produce almost 300 million cubic meters of biogas per year. Biogas plants aren’t completely sealed: escaping from them, methane. The most important source of energy in biogas produces a greenhouse effect, 25 times stronger than carbon dioxide. And also formed in this process, nitrous oxide has 300 times the even greater potential of causing global warming than CO².

Melting glaciers – Associated with rising sea level

Melting glaciers - Fryxellsee Lake on Antarctica

Melting glaciers – Associated with rising sea level

Melting glaciers – Associated with rising sea level – One of the most visible effects of climate change is melting glaciers and the associated rise in sea levels. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on. Climate Change, if we do not reduce the production of greenhouse gases. The level of the oceans by 2100. Could increase by as much as 98 cm. If, however, we limit the production of gases, the water level would increase by 28 – 61 cm. The melting of ice in Antarctica could lead to the extinction of two-thirds of the population of the polar bear (Ursus martimus). In addition, the glaciers will release methane, which is also a greenhouse gas. A reduction in ice cover open while the road between the Atlantic and Pacific, and will make further deposits of raw materials.

Martian methane – Detected in meteorites from Mars

Martian methane - MarsMeteorite- NWA7034

Martian methane – Detected in meteorites from Mars

Martian methane – Detected in meteorites from Mars – Canadian researchers from the University of Brock, in six meteorites from Mars have detected the presence of methane. The researchers also found traces of carbon dioxide, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen and argon. Methane was formed in meteorites probably under the influence of chemical reactions, so it is not of biological origin as methane on Earth. Scientists believe that the volcanic rocks of Mars there are large quantities of methane, which could be a source of energy for underground microbes. This confirms the theory that the Earth there are microbes that live thanks to methane. They live on the bottoms of the oceans in layers of basalt and do not need oxygen. Signals the presence of methane in the Martian atmosphere appeared more than 10 years ago, but so far have failed to unequivocally confirm.